"Please listen to it,
the begging of your body,
it wants me closer."

Daily Haiku on Love by Tyler Knott Gregson (via tylerknott)

(via tylerknott)

allthingseurope:

The Dolomites, Italy (by Angelo Ferraris)

allthingseurope:

The Dolomites, Italy (by Angelo Ferraris)

allthingseurope:

Krakow, Poland (by Simon Whitfield)

allthingseurope:

Krakow, Poland (by Simon Whitfield)

Tags: travel

bluepueblo:

Foggy Day, Kirkjubøur, Faroe Islands
photo via bobby

bluepueblo:

Foggy Day, Kirkjubøur, Faroe Islands

photo via bobby

(via newenglandprepster)

Tags: travel

allthingseurope:

The Blue Grotto, Malta (by nokkie1)

allthingseurope:

The Blue Grotto, Malta (by nokkie1)

Tags: travel

allthingseurope:

Cahir Castle, Ireland (by Zaffiro&Acciaio: Marco Ferrari)

allthingseurope:

Cahir Castle, Ireland (by Zaffiro&Acciaio: Marco Ferrari)

Tags: travel

enchantedengland:


mysticjones: Chepstow Castle by stʲuːwɐt (non-rhotic) Chepstow, Wales

enchantedengland: Chepstow Castle (Welsh: Cas-gwent), looms and broods atop a cliff across the River Wye which separates England and Wales. It’s a huge place, much larger inside than it looks, fantastically atmospheric and praised by intrepid travellers. It is also 12 miles from Tintern Abbey, so there’s your day out; and you can’t beat the price (£4.50)

enchantedengland:

mysticjonesChepstow Castle by stʲuːwɐt (non-rhotic) Chepstow, Wales

enchantedengland: Chepstow Castle (Welsh: Cas-gwent), looms and broods atop a cliff across the River Wye which separates England and Wales. It’s a huge place, much larger inside than it looks, fantastically atmospheric and praised by intrepid travellers. It is also 12 miles from Tintern Abbey, so there’s your day out; and you can’t beat the price (£4.50)

Tags: travel

allthingseurope:

Midhope Castle, Scotland (by Cthonus)

allthingseurope:

Midhope Castle, Scotland (by Cthonus)

Tags: travel

archaicwonder:

Dun Carloway, Isle of Lewis
Dun Carloway is a remarkably well preserved broch which was probably built some time in the 1st century BC,. Radiocarbon dating evidence from remains found in the broch show that it was last occupied around 1300 AD.

archaicwonder:

Dun Carloway, Isle of Lewis

Dun Carloway is a remarkably well preserved broch which was probably built some time in the 1st century BC,. Radiocarbon dating evidence from remains found in the broch show that it was last occupied around 1300 AD.

Tags: travel

archaicwonder:

Hore Abbey, Ireland
Hore Abbey (also known as St. Mary’s Abbey of the Rock) sits both literally and figuratively in the shadow of the mighty Rock of Cashel in County Tipperary. Although the Rock of Cashel is one of the most visited heritage sites in Ireland, very few spend the extra time on a short walk to visit the wonderful Abbey below. The abbey is a Cistercian monastery, and most of the visible remains date to the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries.  Local legend has it that the Abbey was given to the Cistercian order in 1270 AD, as the Archbishop of Cashel, MacCearbhaill, had a dream that the Benedictines (who were the original owners of the site) were plotting against him. He drove the Benedictines from Cashel, and invited the Cistercians to take their place.
The last Abbot of Hore Abbey was Patrick Stackpole, he had held the position for several decades, but peacefully surrendered the Abbey to the Crown Forces during the Dissolution of the Monasteries circa 1540. The lands were granted to the powerful Butler Family, and were eventually transferred again by Queen Elizabeth I to Sir Henry Radcliffe, Earl of Sussex.
photo by BillH-GSACC

archaicwonder:

Hore Abbey, Ireland

Hore Abbey (also known as St. Mary’s Abbey of the Rock) sits both literally and figuratively in the shadow of the mighty Rock of Cashel in County Tipperary. Although the Rock of Cashel is one of the most visited heritage sites in Ireland, very few spend the extra time on a short walk to visit the wonderful Abbey below.

The abbey is a Cistercian monastery, and most of the visible remains date to the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries.  Local legend has it that the Abbey was given to the Cistercian order in 1270 AD, as the Archbishop of Cashel, MacCearbhaill, had a dream that the Benedictines (who were the original owners of the site) were plotting against him. He drove the Benedictines from Cashel, and invited the Cistercians to take their place.

The last Abbot of Hore Abbey was Patrick Stackpole, he had held the position for several decades, but peacefully surrendered the Abbey to the Crown Forces during the Dissolution of the Monasteries circa 1540. The lands were granted to the powerful Butler Family, and were eventually transferred again by Queen Elizabeth I to Sir Henry Radcliffe, Earl of Sussex.

photo by BillH-GSACC

Tags: travel